Olaf Falafel – Q&A

Olaf Falafel

Olaf Falafel

A surrealist comedian, children’s book author/illustrator and winner of the Funniest Joke of The Edinburgh Festival. Olaf’s stand up shows include his award nominated debut hour ‘Olaf Falafel and The Cheese Of Truth’, ‘The Marmosets Of My Mind’, ‘Knitting With Maracas’ and the award winning ‘There’s no i in idiot’.

Olaf is the author and illustrator of several kids books including the flatulent ‘Old MacDonald Heard A Parp’ trilogy, ‘It’s One Giant Leek For Mankind’, ‘Blobfish’ and his first middle grade series for Puffin Books ‘Trixie Pickle Art Avenger’.

As well as finding comedic success onstage, Falafel has also enjoyed online fame with his short viral videos. These absurdist movies include slices of truth telling cheese being thrown onto newspapers, Opera singers mixed with modem dial up tones and the Bee Gees hiding in his beard.

The comedy website Chortle affectionately described Falafel as ‘an idiot’ and when he doesn’t have a microphone in his hand you’ll probably find him with a pencil and pad trying to draw something equally idiotic.

Olaf can be found at:
Website: www.olaffalafel.com
Twitter: @OFalafel
Instagram: @olaffalafel

When did you know you wanted to become an illustrator?

When i was around 8 or 9 I used to make my own comics, get my dad to photocopy them at work and sell them in the playground at school. That was probably the start of both my comedy and my illustration.

How long does it typically take to make a page or cover for a book?

It varies so much – I’ve just created a cover for a book proposal that took me four hours but I’ve got spreads in some of my picture books that have taken four days

What’s your favourite piece of art equipment?

I love the Pentel Brush pen, it gives a great line and it’s not to messy. I swear by it.

Do you have a favourite colour scheme, if so what and why?

Before I was a comedian/author/illustrator I worked in design and ad agencies. One designer nicknamed me Timmy Mallet because I always liked using bright and garish colour combinations. He still calls me it to this day.

Who were your inspirations when starting out?

Pete Fowler was and is the illustrator whose work I’ve always loved. I discovered him through the artwork he did for the Super Furry Animals, I love the characters he creates – a perfect blend of funny with stylish.

Do you have another job beside being an illustrator, if so what?

I’m a comedian! The two jobs really go hand in hand for me, especially as I like to try and make funny books. Also the onstage experience helps when I do school events, a room full of kids and a room full of drunk adults are surprisingly similar!

What do you do to overcome a creative block?

Go for a walk – I read something ages ago about kinetic thinking – how your brain fires up when the legs are going. Could be complete rubbish but my brain seems to enjoy a stroll.

Do you have a favourite piece in your portfolio, if so could you share it and talk about it?

I like the nap/dream illustration from Old MacDonald Heard A Parp. Partly for sentimental reasons because it was my first ever children’s book and also because it’s quite weird. There are floppy Dalí-esque clock, a farting unicorn and a couple of hidden jokes in there such as the planet Mercury looking like Freddie Mercury.

What was your first book related project?

It was Old MacDonald Heard A Parp which was originally called Old MacDonald Heard A Fart but the publishers felt it was too rude for UK audiences so I begrudgingly changed it. You can get hold of hardback Fart copies in Australia and New Zealand though!

What type of media do you prefer to work in and why?

Ink and watercolours or digitally drawing in Procreate.

Do you have a playlist you like working to? If so do you want to share it?

Lately I’ve been listening to Dave Brubek when I need to think – the upbeat scattergun jazz seems to help. If I’m drawing and don’t need to think too much I’ll have a movie playing in the background. Anything with Liam Neeson or Denzel Washington usually does the job.

Do you have any rituals when working?

Not really, I like to change things up in terms of where in the house I draw – I get bored if I’m in the same chair for too long.

Do you have a favourite artist outside of the world of books, if so who and why?

Peter Blake has always been a favourite since my college days. I like his deceptively simplistic style and the humour in his paintings.

Did the books you read as a child influence your work?

I loved Richard Scarry’s books when I was little, I was fascinated by all the small details and how all the different things were labelled. The running jokes that went through his books are definitely something I try and add to mine. When I was a bit older, around nine or ten I discovered The Ha Ha Bonk Book by Janet and Allan Ahlberg. It was filled with great jokes, surreal characters and loads of bonus humour within the illustrations.

Has your illustration/art style changed over time?

I have an instinctive way of drawing characters that has remained fairly consistent over the years – bendy limbs and a treble-yoo nose (like a double-you but with an extra u). I like to experiment with different mediums and styles but I like to try and keep it recognisable as something I’ve made.

How closely do you work with the author on developing the illustrations for a book?

Very closely as the author in most cases is me!

If you could illustrate any classic book which would it be and why?

I quite like the idea of illustrating A Midsummer Night’s Dream because of all the fairies, fools, queens and kings.

Which illustrated books in the last year have you loved?

I’m a big fan of Gustavo The Shy Ghost by Flavia Z Drago and also the follow up Leila The Perfect Witch.

If you can please tell us about your latest project and if not your last project.

Trixie Pickle Art Avenger is my latest book, it’s also my first foray into ‘middle grade’ chapter books. I was (and still am) what they call a ‘reluctant reader’ so I wanted to make something accessible to kids like me. It’s influenced by The Beano, Diary of a Wimpy kid, The Ha Ha Bonk Book and Viz. I’ve rammed it full of funny illustrations and because it features real facts on famous artists as well as farts it’s the perfect blend of high and low brow and actually quite educational. Also, the follow up book, Trixie Pickle Art Avenger Toxic Takedown is out on May 4th so that’s exciting!

Do you have any events on in the near future?

I’m at the Leicester Festival on February 19th where I’ll be doing a book event followed by a family friendly comedy event and then a ‘grown up’ comedy show. I’ll be up at the Edinburgh Festival again in August doing loads of funny stuff.


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Maria Oliver – Q&A

Once Upon a Time, You...

Once Upon a Time, You…

Maria Oliver is a Hertfordshire based yoga teacher and member of the British Wheel of Yoga. She started teaching yoga in 2015, much to her children’s disgust, and spent the next few years trying to work out how to interest them in what she did. This changed when she started her children’s yoga teacher training with Calm for Kids, and she learnt how to spark children’s imaginations through yoga.

Maria has written three collections of relaxation scripts for lively children, and one yoga adventure book which has been translated into French and Ukrainian.

Maria is married with two children and two cats.

Maria can be found here:
Website: www.boxmooryoga.co.uk
Twitter: @boxmooryoga
Instagram: @boxmooryoga
Facebook: @boxmooryoga

When did you know you wanted to become an illustrator?

I’ve always loved drawing, but as I didn’t study art and design I thought I’d shut off that part of my brain and any future opportunity to work in this area.

In 2021 I had the idea of writing a children’s yoga book and approached an illustrator called Lizzie Martell. She didn’t have the time to take the book on. However, when I shyly suggested that perhaps she could support me in illustrating the book myself, she was very encouraging and enthusiastic. She gave me tips on the best art materials to buy and helped by scanning in the pictures and ensuring that the digital files were of print quality.

How long does it typically take to make a page or cover for a book?

AGES. I draw in pencil, go over in ink and then paint with watercolours. As I draw children in yoga poses, I have to make sure that the way they are positioned is accurate so that children can copy correctly and safely. There is energy in each yoga pose, and I have to be sure that the energy comes across in the illustration. Alignment of body parts is important too! Lizzie then scans the illustrations in and we work together to make sure that the final digital file is just right.

What’s your favourite piece of art equipment?

I love my watercolour paints, even though I can best be described as ‘an enthusiastic amateur’. I paint a bit like a child has got hold of the paintbox and I have a bit of an untidy style. I think that’s why children like my illustrations.

Do you have a favourite colour scheme, if so what and why?

Purple and green. I love those two colours together. Green relates to harmony and love, purple relates to inner wisdom and intuition. Both are associated with calm.

Who were your inspirations when starting out?

Lizzie Martell was very inspirational. She illustrates greetings cards and was a winner of Theo Paphitis’ Small Business Sunday and has met him several times. She is not formally trained either, and made me believe I could illustrate my own book.

I love Axel Scheffler’s illustrations. I think we have the same cartoonish drawing style, even though he has more command of his paints! But reading his books to my children when they were small made me think ‘I could draw that too.’

Do you have another job beside being an illustrator, if so what?

I am a yoga teacher! I teach children, adults, pregnant women and new mums. I’ve always loved drawing and creative writing, but being a yoga teacher has also given me an excuse to write my yoga and relaxation books for children. The two inform each other – I have created resources that I can use in my classes and share with other yoga teachers, school teachers and parents, and the books themselves are inspired by yoga philosophy, teaching yoga, and my class members.

What do you do to overcome a creative block?

I don’t tend to get them! I have to juggle teaching my classes and organising my home and children. I find that ideas come to me and then I have to make time to carry them out. It’s very rare that I sit down to draw and write and find that I’m lacking in ideas. Normally when I finally get the opportunity to sit down, the ideas have all stacked up and are bursting to be let out.

Do you have a favourite piece in your portfolio, if so could you share it and talk about it?

It is hard to choose, but I think it has to be the flying horse and the flying foal. It is entirely about unconditional love and forgiveness.

Firstly, I wanted my books to be inclusive. The genders of the flying horse and foal are never given, and neither is their relationship. The horse could be a parent, step parent, foster parent, grandparent, teacher, aunt or uncle. They might be the sole caregiver, or there may be another caregiver in the background. I didn’t want to depict a mother or father as caregiver. Any child could look at that relationship and think ‘that’s about me’.

The foal has learnt to fly, and has flown off. The horse needs your help (as the reader) to catch them. When the foal is caught, they say they are sorry and they are instantly forgiven. In the illustration, the foal looks a little like they feel they do not deserve this unconditional love.

They know they have misbehaved and caused a lot of trouble. All children are worthy of unconditional love, no matter how much trouble they cause.

What was your first book related project?

I wrote a collection of relaxation scripts for children during Lockdown in 2020. I had to quickly adapt to teaching yoga online. I used Zoom and I also recorded YouTube videos. I learnt that I could not record myself reading someone else’s book without permission from the publisher.

Unfortunately, yoga teachers love books! We use readings at the end of yoga classes, we quote from old texts… so I wrote my own relaxation scripts and collected them together into a children’s book, ‘Red Kites, Apples and Blood Cells’, working with illustrators Ben and Steph Grandis.

@hat type of media do you prefer to work in and why?

Now I have discovered watercolours I love them, although I know I have a lot to learn.

Do you have a playlist you like working to? If so do you want to share it?

I am so fussy about music, that I could spend hours choosing what I listen to, so I prefer not to. I have very limited time to work and need to just sit down and get on with it.

Do you have any rituals when working?

I like to have a cup of tea. I have to be very careful not to dip my paintbrush into it.

Do you have a favourite artist outside of the world of books, if so who and why?

I love the Impressionists and have always been entranced by Monet’s Waterlily paintings. I could stand and stare and become immersed for hours. I studied English and French studies at University, and learnt a lot about Impressionism as part of my French course.

Did the books you read as a child influence your work?

In terms of story, I used to love Choose Your Own Adventure Books, and Asterix Adventure Game books, although I’d always make wrong choices and end up meeting a sticky end. In my yoga books, there are no wrong choices and they all end with a guided relaxation, like every yoga class should.

In terms of illustrators, because I loved Roald Dahl, I owned lots of books containing Quentin Blake illustrations. As a child, I really wanted to tidy up his wobbly lines, but I could also appreciate that his pictures were very skillful! I liked his detailed pictures of The Twits when their home is turned completely upside down, and The BFG when he has breakfast at Buckingham Palace, on a table using Grandfather Clocks as legs.

Has your illustration/art style changed over time?

I very much draw the way I did as a child! But I’ve moved on from colouring pencils to watercolours.

How closely do you work with the author on developing the illustrations for a book?

As I am the author, very closely indeed! I have a very clear idea about how I want the books to be laid out and how the text and images fit together. Being self-published means I have total control over the book.

If you could illustrate any classic book which would it be and why?

Oh my goodness. I don’t think I could possibly. I can only imagine the illustrations matching the text as they are already.

Which illustrated books in the last year have you loved?

Blobfish by Olaf Falafel. I buy picture books to use in children’s yoga classes and I thought this book was brilliant. It’s about loneliness and friendship, ocean conservation, littering and bad jokes. When I use it in children’s yoga classes, they all love it and laugh all the way through. The illustrations are great fun as well. And best of all, I can fit yoga poses into the story! I use revolved half moon pose for ‘litter picking pose’ if you’re interested!

If you can please tell us about your latest project and if not your last project

The first book I illustrated was ‘Once Upon a Time, You… a Yoga Adventure where you choose what happens!’ It came out in 2021, and last year I had it translated into Ukrainian and crowdfunded so that 200 copies could be printed and distributed to schools and host families around the UK.

I am now working on the sequel, called ‘Not so long ago, You…’ and now I’ve illustrated one book, I know exactly how much hard work this one will be! Both books are adventure picture books where you can choose who you fly with and where you fly. There are objects to find on each page, decisions to make, and of course lots of yoga poses!

do you have any events on in the near future?

I don’t have anything concrete planned yet, but if you go to www.boxmooryoga.co.uk I share all my news there.


If you want to help and support this blog and my other projects (Indie Publishers and Indie Bookshops) you could become a Patreon which would help pay for my hosting, domain names, streaming services, and the occasional bag of popcorn to eat while watching films.

If you can’t support with a monthly subscription a tip at my Ko-Fi is always appreciated, as is buying things from my Ko-Fi Shop.

You can always email me on contact@bigbeardedbookseller.com with any suggestions.

James Mayhew – Q&A

James Mayhew

James Mayhew

Award-winning author & illustrator James Mayhew is the creator of the best-selling KATIE series, ELLA BELLA books and ONCE UPON A TUNE. He is also the illustrator of MRS NOAH’S POCKETS (by Jackie Morris), the MOUSE & MOLE series (by Joyce Dunbar), Polari Prize-winner NEN AND THE LONELY FISHERMAN (by Ian Eagleton) and GASPARD THE FOX by Zeb Soanes.

James is also a presenter of family classical concerts, and takes part in many unique events at music festivals all over the country. His collaborators include the London Mozart Players, BBC National Orchestra of Wales and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra.

James can be found at:
Website: www.jamesmayhew.co.uk
Twitter: @mrjamesmayhew
Instagram: @mrjamesmayhew

When did you know you wanted to become an illustrator?

I always drew as a kid, but the decision to be an illustrator came much later. After school I took a foundation course in Art & Design at Lowestoft College. Initially I wanted to go on to study Fine Art, or Set Design. It took a while until I accepted the obvious choice – my work was always very much about drawing and narrative, so Illustration was an almost inevitable choice in the end. Even so, it was only when my first book was published (“Katie’s Picture Show”, 1989) that I really thought I’d found my vocation.

How long does it typically take to make a page or cover for a book?

The most time consuming part is often the preliminary sketches, and any research required – looking at periods of architecture or costume for example. This is when most of the decisions are made, and it can take a long time, days or even weeks. The final art would usually take a day or two.

What’s your favourite piece of art equipment?

A pair of embroidery scissors that I use when cutting papers for collage.

Scissors and collage

Scissors and collage

Do you have a favourite colour scheme, if so what and why?

I am very drawn to blues and turquoise, and I don’t really know why. I could say its because I grew up in Suffolk near the sea, and with big skies – or because of their melancholy vibe… but I don’t really think that’s true. I just like them!

Who were your inspirations when starting out?

Book illustrators! Especially the ones I grew up with: Edward Ardizzone, Tove Jansson, Brian Wildsmith, Quentin Blake, John Burningham, Maurice Sendak – a golden age!

Do you have another job beside being an illustrator, if so what?

Well, I’m a writer too, but of course that’s completely intertwined with being an illustrator.

What do you do to overcome a creative block?

I walk away – and do something different. I might walk the dog, bake a cake or do something unrelated but still creative. Maybe sketching or painting for something other than a book. Sometimes it helps to talk through problems with my husband Toto. Ultimately, most things just need time to resolve.

Do you have a favourite piece in your portfolio, if so could you share it and talk about it?

I’m hyper-critical of everything I do, but I have a great fondness for an image in Mrs Noah’s Song (story by Jackie Morris, published by Otter-Barry books). I love creating images in collage, and this was a really favourite. I depicts the dawn chorus, as the Noah family awake in a hammock. Once, as a child, I spent the night in a hammock and really was awakened by the dawn chorus – I’ve never forgotten it! So there is a lot memory and meaning in this image.

What was your first book related project?

My first ever commission was from Virago Press to illustrate the front cover of “Up The Junction” by Nell Dunn – about as far away from a children’s book as you can get. But it’s only my first by a few hours as the SAME DAY I got offered a contract for “Katie’s Picture Show”! The stars were clearly aligned that day in 1987!

What type of media do you prefer to work in and why?

For many years I used dip pen and ink, tools I still love and respond to. But latterly I’ve been exploring print-making and collage and I feel it’s brought an element of play and experiment into my work which I find very exciting.

Do you have a playlist you like working to? If so do you want to share it?

Nothing fixed – I might listen to ABBA one day and a tragic opera the next! I’m often drawn to music by specific performers. I love the voice of the Spanish singer Victoria de los Angeles, so I’ll happily listen to anything she recorded. Rossini overtures are great for meeting a deadline, they keep me going. I love the sound world of Sibelius. And if life gets too much, Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Scheherazade” is my “reset” music.

Do you have any rituals when working?

No, I don’t think I do. I believe every book is unique and different. A ritual might suggest a formula.

Do you have a favourite artist outside of the world of books, if so who and why?

I’ve explored many artists in the “Katie” series, but one artist who I love, and who was never featured in a “Katie” book, is Samuel Palmer. I love the rhapsodic nature of his work.

Did the books you read as a child influence your work?

Absolutely. In both conscious and unconscious ways. The illustrators I mentioned before were all experts with drawing in ink, and their line work was a huge inspiration. But I also find echoes of stories I loved creeping into my work, especially folk tales and myths. I firmly believe our childhood experiences, including books, words and pictures, never leave us.

Has your illustration/art style changed over time?

Yes. I don’t believe in being a “brand” and sticking with one “style”. I prefer to change, grow, evolve as I learn more and become more experienced. One of the problems of working on a long running series like “Katie” or “Mouse and Mole” is the need to be consistent, but increasingly I am moving away from drawing in ink and towards collage and print-making. I find I surprise myself and create images I didn’t necessarily expect to make. I like that thrill. It keeps it all fresh for me and challenges me.

How closely do you work with the author on developing the illustrations for a book?

Traditionally publishers acted as a go-between and you almost never spoke with an author. Nowadays it’s so much easier to be in touch, and it makes books much better I think, truly collaborative. Certainly with “Gaspard the Fox” by Zeb Soanes, a real friendship has grown and Zeb often provides reference images for the illustrations. Likewise, Ian Eagleton was a lovely collaborator with our Polari Prize winning book “Nen And The Lonely Fisherman”.

If you could illustrate any classic book which would it be and why?

So many favourites have already been brilliantly done, it’s hard to choose, but I keep coming back to “The Snow Queen” by Hans Christian Andersen, which has haunted me since childhood. I think that’s something I’d love to dive into and interpret my way!

Which illustrated books in the last year have you loved?

I loved “Dadaji’s Paintbrush” by Rashmi Sirdeshpande, Illustrated by Ruchi Mhasane (an ex-student of mine from India!).

If you can please tell us about your latest project and if not your last project

My latest project is a collaboration with my husband, the Spanish artist Toto Martinez. Uniquely, we both co-wrote it and co-illustrated it. It’s a fresh new version of “The Frog Prince”. In our version, it’s the frog who is on a quest for happiness, but his “happy ever after” is a bit different to what he expected. We are really excited about this inclusive fairy tale – it’s guaranteed to make your heart skip a beat! It’s published by Scholastic on May 11th.

The Frog’s Kiss

The Frog’s Kiss

Do you have any events on in the near future?

In the Spring I’ll be touring Scotland with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra in a series of schools concerts based on my book “Once Upon A Tune”, which is really exciting. I’ll be presenting the concerts and painting live illustrations during the performances! I’ll also be leading a week long retreat, for picture-book creators, in Spain in May.


If you want to help and support this blog and my other projects (Indie Publishers and Indie Bookshops) you could become a Patreon which would help pay for my hosting, domain names, streaming services, and the occasional bag of popcorn to eat while watching films.

If you can’t support with a monthly subscription a tip at my Ko-Fi is always appreciated, as is buying things from my Ko-Fi Shop.

You can always email me on contact@bigbeardedbookseller.com with any suggestions.

Favourite Childhood Books

Matilda

Matilda

Across on Book Buddy we have just run a competition to win a BookBuddy pin and postcard, all people had to do was let us know what their favourite childhood book was in a comment on the post.

We had a great response, with over 200 retweets and over 200 comments. Most people chose a single book but there were a few who just couldn’t and went for a series of books; various Enid Blyton series, Worst Witch series, Harry Potter, C.S. Lewis, Philip Pullman, and Tolkien being the most common, plus a couple for the Goosebumps series, plus one for the Molesworth series.

The winner (chosen at random) was Lauren Murray who loved ‘When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit’ by Judith Kerr.

I was glad to see my childhood favourite was up there, ‘The Hobbit’, at equal second.

Here is a rundown of the books from most votes down:

09 Matilda
09 The Magic Faraway Tree
05 The Hobbit
05 The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
04 Swallows and Amazons
04 George’s Marvelous Medicine
03 Ballet Shoes
03 Stig of the Dump
03 The B.F.G.
03 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
03 Danny, the Champion of the World
03 The Folk in the Faraway Tree
03 Charlotte’s Web
03 The Tiger That Came to Tea
02 Moonfleet
02 Harriet the Spy
02 Anne of Green Gables
02 The Waterbabies
02 The Little Town on the Prairie
02 Wind in the Willows
02 The Jolly Christmas Postman
02 Charmed Life
02 The Weirdstone of Brisingamen
02 Little Women
02 Dogger
02 Where The Wild Things Are
02 Northern Lights
01 The Grey Dancer
01 The Crystal Forest
01 What Katy Did
01 EiEiO
01 Sula
01 Owl Babies
01 Charles
01 The Twits
01 Alice in Wonderland
01 Gone With The Wind
01 The Wizard of Oz
01 Daphne’s Book
01 The Wishing Chair
01 The Search for Delicious
01 The House that Sailed Away
01 The Hungry Caterpillar
01 Abby Goes to the Hospital
01 Just So Stories
01 Five Children and It
01 Pippi Longstockings
01 Each Peach, Pear, Plum
01 Quick Let’s Get Out of Here
01 Dear Zoo
01 Black Beauty
01 Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone
01 Would You Rather
01 The Bogwoppit
01 The Blue Balloon
01 Dorrie and the Goblin
01 Greyfriar’s Bobby
01 Cinderella
01 The Velveteen Rabbit
01 The Giving Tree
01 The Outsiders
01 The Sevret Garden
01 The Borrowers
01 When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit
01 The Little Prince
01 Wise Child
01 Prince Caspian
01 Where’s Spot
01 Peace at Last
01 Harold and the Purple Crayon
01 All for You Blue Kangaroo
01 If You Give a Mouse a Cookie
01 The Gruffalo
01 Jumbo the Plane
01 The Great Green Mouse Disaster
01 The Adventures of the Little Wooden Horse
01 The Colour of Magic
01 King of the Copper Mountains
01 The Mona Lisa Mystery
01 The Singing Tree
01 The Enchanted Wood
01 Meg and Mog
01 A Dark, Dark Tale
01 Lighthouse Keeper’s Lunch
01 The Good Master
01 The Book of Three
01 Millie, Molly, Mandy
01 We Didn’t Mean to go to Sea
01 A Dinosaur Called Minerva
01 Five Little Kittens
01 The Elves and the Shoemaker
01 The Secret Seven
01 The Secret Island
01 Calling B for Butterfly
01 The Large Family
01 Six Dinner Sid
01 Father Christmas
01 Fungus the Bogeyman
01 The Teeny, Tiny Woman
01 A Book for a Nook
01 Twas the Night Before Christmas
01 The Lottie Project
01 Charlotte Sometimes
01 What Katy Did
01 Sam’s Sandwich
01 Gobbolino the Witch’s Cat
01 The Worst Witch
01 Olga da Polga
01 James and the Giant Peach
01 Jane Eyre
01 The Suitcase Kid
01 The Illustrated Mum
01 Dear Teddy Robinson
01 Funniest Story Book Ever
01 The Wolves of Willoughby Chase
01 The Children of Cherrytree Farm
01 Fantastic Mr Fox
01 Don’t Forget the Bacon
01 The Silver Brumby
01 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
01 The Silver Sword
01 The Journeys of Mikhail Stroggoff
01 Mrs Pepperpot
01 The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark
01 Pookie and the Circus
01 James and the Giant Peach
01 Emil and the Detectives
01 Goodnight Mr Tom
01 Magician’s Nephew
01 Gulag Archipelago
01 Dead Letter Box
01 Where the Sidewalk Ends
01 Runaways
01 Little Pup

(originally posted on Indie Bookshops 2018)


If you want to help and support this blog and my other projects (Indie Publishers and Indie Bookshops) you could become a Patreon which would help pay for my hosting, domain names, streaming services, and the occasional bag of popcorn to eat while watching films.

If you can’t support with a monthly subscription a tip at my Ko-Fi is always appreciated, as is buying things from my Ko-Fi Shop.

You can always email me on contact@bigbeardedbookseller.com with any suggestions.